Chai on the patio

Last year Burpham Pages spoke to Mandira Sarkar, founder and inspiration behind Mandira’s Kitchen based at Silent Pool. We learnt about (and sampled a few of) the fantastic authentic Indian meals that they produce and sell frozen from their converted cowshed in the Surrey Hills. Alongside the meals the team at MK also offer hands on cookery lessons, spice tours and bespoke catering in between sampling the gin and wine from their neighbours!

Well, Mandira and her dedicated team haven’t been standing still whilst in lockdown and have been creating new experiences as well as new recipes and have now launched their ‘Chai On The Patio’ offering.

This new addition to Mandira’s Kitchen provides the most delicious spot to enjoy fabulous Indian street food. Beautifully positioned, they have five tables of six which can be booked for slots of one hour (or more) where you can catch up with family & friends over some delicious food and drink. Each 1 hour slot costs £20 and is fully redeemable against any purchases you make on your visit.

They have an exciting street food menu – which you can order at the time of your booking, plus you can always add more dishes when you get there.

Walk-ins are welcome, but booking is advisable especially for busy times and weekends. The menu is also designed to be a takeaway should you wish to enjoy elsewhere.

Masala chai is a tea beverage made by boiling black tea in milk and water with a mixture of aromatic herbs and spices. Originating in India, the beverage is traditionally prepared as a decoction of green cardamom pods, cinnamon sticks, ground cloves, ground ginger, and black peppercorn together with black tea leaves.

Talking to Mandira she clearly has missed the freedom recently to visit home but we are fortunate that she is happy to recreate the taste of home here to share with us. “Summer seems to have passed us by but I still consider myself so lucky to be in beautiful Burpham during these uncertain times. We have the ancient Medieval town with every modern amenity within walking distance as well as the stunning Surrey hills on our doorstep too – the best of both worlds. Not being able to travel to India to see my family and eat at our favourite restaurants, I have tried to recreate many of my favourite dishes and here is one to share with you. Perfect with a cup of chai or a glass of wine or gin or beer…

Recipe: Mandira’s easy to make pakoras

Ingredients (makes 15 medium sized pakoras):

To make these delicious morsels you will need:

  • 2 large red onions sliced
  • A bag of baby spinach, chopped
  • Approx. 2 heaped tablespoons of gram flour (besan)
  • 1 heaped tablespoon of rice flour (optional – can substitute with self raising flour if you want)
  • Salt to taste
  • 1½ tsp chilli powder
  • 1 level tsp chilli powder
  • 1 finely sliced green chilli
  • 1 tsp of coriander seeds, roughly ground – you need to be able to bite into these
  • Oil (enough to cover your pan to the depth of an inch)
  • Cold water (alternatively you can use beer)

Method:

  1. Tip all the ingredients, except the water (or beer) and oil into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Add about 3 tbsp water (or beer) to start with and gently try and bring together. The mixture should hold but not get too thick or doughy – the secret to light fluffy pakoras is not too much gram flour. If you find you need a little more binding then add gram flour and if it is too dry add a tiny bit more water (or beer).
  3. Let it rest for a few minutes.
  4. Heat oil – about an inch to cover the pan. A wok is usually good but a heavy bottom frying pan also does the job.
  5. Once the oil is smoking reduce the heat and then gently spoon a tablespoon of the batter into the hot oil. Careful to regulate the temperature, if it’s too hot it will remain raw inside and burn outside – too cold and you get greasy pakoras. Should take about 3 minutes on each side.
  6. Drain on a kitchen towel and serve hot with ketchup or a mint and yoghurt sauce.

Mint and Yoghurt Sauce

Blend together 1 clove of garlic, half a cup of mint leaves, salt and ½ cup of Greek yoghurt. Serve chilled with pakoras.

About Mandira

Burpham resident, Mandira is the owner (general dogsbody) of Mandira’s Kitchen. MK are a wholly woman led business operating out of a 400 year old converted cowshed overlooking the beautiful Silent Pool. They create award winning Indian food offering authentic homestyle freezer meals, bespoke catering, Indian picnics, hands on cookery lesson and spice tours. Mandira’s Kitchen now offer an authentic street food cafe option on their patio which is a fabulous way to spend some time with friends and family.


Yvonne Arnaud Theatre announces Autumn 2021 Season

Clare Bloomer (Maggie Thatcher) & Martin Jarvis (Ted Heath) star in new political comedy Maggie and Ted (12th to 16th October).

The Yvonne Arnaud Theatre has an exciting autumn season planned!

If you need a laugh after the past 18 months there’s comedy aplenty, including the latest production from the creators of The Play That Goes Wrong, Groan Ups (20 to 25 Sep); Agatha Christie-inspired romp, Crimes in Egypt (8 & 9 Sep); and evenings with Miriam Margolyes, David Suchet, Andy Hamilton and Arthur Smith and more.

A stand out production of the season is new political comedy Maggie and Ted (12 to 16 Oct), starring Martin Jarvis and Clare Bloomer. Shining a light on the relationship between Margaret Thatcher and Ted Heath, this uproariously funny play comes to Guildford only, direct from a sell-out West End debut.

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (18 to 23 Oct).

Are thrillers more your thing? If so, you’re in luck! The most scandalous political thriller of the year, Dead Lies (2 to 6 Nov), stars Clive Mantle, Harriet Thorpe, Kimberley Wyatt and more. There’s also ghost stories galore, with a gripping new adaptation of American classic, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (18 to 23 Oct), starring Wendi Peters and Bill Ward; and terrifying new spine-chiller When Darkness Falls (28 to 30 Sep).

Families can enjoy a delightful adaptation of Julia Donaldson and Lydia Monks’ award-winning picture book, What the Ladybird Heard (5 & 6 Oct) packed full of live music and puppetry. The theatre’s much-loved panto will also return (3 Dec to 9 Jan) for lashings of slapstick silliness for all aged 5 to 105!

Much-loved panto will return (3 Dec to 9 Jan) for lashings of slapstick silliness for all aged 5 to 105!

Other season highlights include Being Mr Wickham, with Adrian Lukis as Pride and Prejudice’s most roguish gentleman (28 to 30 Oct); Andrew Lloyd Webber and Don Black’s iconic musical, Tell Me On A Sunday (16 to 20 Nov), starring Jodie Prenger; and Olivier Award-winning Ian McDiarmid in the world premiere of Julian Barnes’ The Lemon Table (9 to 13 Nov).

As well as Main House productions, the Yvonne Arnaud team are thrilled to bring performance back to the Mill Studio after a long period of closure. There’s a diverse programme on offer,
including the acclaimed Paines Plough Theatre’s Sessions (30 Oct), and award-winning Who Cares (23 Oct) from Lung Theatre, as well as a delightfully festive recreation of Charles Dickens’ famous performance of A Christmas Carol, performed by John O’Connor, in the lead up to Christmas (20 to 24 Dec).

To find out more or to keep up to date with the latest news, visit www.yvonne-arnaud.co.uk or sign up to the theatre’s mailing list and social media channels.


Lewis Carroll: Guildford’s Links to Wonderland

By Alex Rose

As Alice embarked on her journey through the looking glass, Carroll began his life in Guildford, the place that may have partially inspired ‘Looking-Glass House’, the fictional parallel of ‘Wonderland’ from the famous sequel, ‘Through The Looking Glass’. So, how was the children’s author of ‘Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland’ impacted by Guildford?

Behind the picturesque Guildford castle, and its beautiful grounds, Castle Hill boasts the famous grade two listed building, The Chestnuts, acquired in 1868 by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (more famously known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll) for his six sisters. By then, he had already written his first successful book, ‘Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland’, and that same year he would begin writing its sequel, ‘Through The Looking Glass’.

Born on January 27, 1832, in Daresbury, Cheshire, he and his ten siblings grew up in isolated villages in the English countryside with their father, Reverand Charles Dodgson, and mother, Frances Jane Lutwidge. As the eldest boy of the family, he was skilled at entertaining himself and his brothers and sisters, making up a number of games and telling imaginative stories. He attended Christ Church, Oxford and graduated in 1854 with degrees in mathematics and classics. He was also a keen photographer, notably shooting pictures of actress Ellen Terry and poet Alfred Tennyson. After graduating, he stayed at Christ Church, and became a lecturer, teaching mathematics – a position he had sought. Although taking deacon’s orders in 1861, Dodgson was never ordained a priest, as his stammer made preaching difficult.

If you take a walk through the castle grounds today, you might notice the locally famous statue of Alice in the moment she enters through the looking glass, reaching out towards the ruins of Guildford Castle.

Due to this stammer – which he referred to as his ‘hesitation’ – and his position in the family, with eight younger siblings, he found it easier to talk to children, three of which were the children of Henry George Liddell, Christ Church’s dean. The Liddell children – Lorina, Edith and Alice – held an important place in his affections. They were the only children at Christ Church whilst he tutored there. On July 4, 1862, he and his friend, Robinson Duckworth, took a boat from Oxford to Godstow along the Thames and picnicked on the bank. This is where Dodgson first recounted the story of ‘Alice’s adventures underground’, revealing the story of a little girl called Alice who fell down a rabbit hole and travelled into a fantasy world.

One of Lewis Carroll’s own illustrations of Alice from ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’.

The story was partially based on a picnic taken by the same party around two weeks earlier, when they all got caught in the rain. Both Alice and Duckworth remarked on how improved this story was from his others, and Alice went as far as to plead with Dodgson to write it out. Not only did he handwrite it, he also illustrated it and presented it to her for Christmas in 1864. Within a year he had published it under the title of ‘Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland’.

Other marks of his links to Guildford are the March Hare pub near Guildford Castle, and The Mad Hatter hat shop.

While Dodgson lived in Oxford, he often visited his family in Guildford. Where he not only enjoyed holidaying, but also fully took part in local life. In many ways, Guildford was his perfect second home, even allowing a quick journey to parts of London he frequented. He became good friends with the headmaster of the local royal grammar school, and the banker who lived next door. He was often called upon to preach at St Mary’s
Church on Quarry street, which was, and still is, the oldest building in the town.

A photograph of Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) later in life.

Another of Dodgson’s pastimes was to take leisurely walks around the castle grounds, where it is thought that he was inspired to write ‘The Hunting Of The Snark’.

If you take a similar walk through the castle grounds today, you might notice the locally famous statue of Alice in the moment she enters through the looking glass, reaching out towards the ruins of Guildford Castle. The statue, ‘Alice Through The Looking Glass’ sits in the Alice Garden, just behind The Chestnuts. It was sculpted in 1990 by Jeanne Argent to memorialise Lewis Carroll and his famous sequel, ‘Through The Looking Glass’, which he wrote in Guilford within the year of procuring the family home. At the start of the book, Alice travels through the looking glass on the fireplace mantel, and finds a very different world, similar to how Dodgson and his family must have experienced a large change when moving to Guildford.

Statue of Alice in the moment she enters through the looking glass. Sculpted in 1990 by Jeanne Argent.

Any visitor to Guildford would notice Carrolll’s impact woven through the town, including two statues, one previously mentioned, and one on the bank of the river Wey. This second statue was sculpted by local artist Edwin Russell in 1984 and depicts the two sisters from the book – Alice watching as the white rabbit leaps towards the rabbit hole. Other marks of his links to Guildford are the March Hare pub near Guildford Castle, and The Mad Hatter hat shop.

Lewis Carroll is buried in The Mount cemetery, Guildford, where you can still find his grave today, under a pine tree to the left of the chapel.

Sadly, on January 14, 1898, Dodgson died of Pneumonia after a bout of influenza. He passed away at The Chestnuts, two weeks away from turning 66 years old, and was buried in The Mount cemetery, where you can still find his grave today, under a pine tree to the left of the chapel.

Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) is buried in The Mount cemetery, Guildford, where you can still find his grave today.

Carroll’s remarkable imagination and nonsensical style has entertained generations of readers and influenced pop culture in countless ways, and Alice’s stories continue to shape the world from their spiritual home in the town of Guildford.


Sport in Burpham

Moira MacQuaide’s history of Burpham

Burpham FC 1970s (E Voller)

Burpham Football Club was established in 1956, using the newly opened Playing Fields. Local builder, Percy Howard, built the small pavilion as changing rooms – plus a place for a barrel of beer after matches! The Green Man also had a team that played on Sundays. After Guildford City FC ceased playing at Joseph Road in 1996 Burpham FC were asked to move to the Spectrum to represent Guildford, becoming AFC Guildford. Burpham FC now plays in the Guildford & Woking Alliance Football League. In 2000 a group of Burpham fathers started Burpham Juniors FC.

Burpham Juniors 1969 (E Voller)

Burpham Cricket Club was established in 1957, also using the Playing Fields. In 1999 they merged with Worplesdon and since 2011 have played their matches at Worplesdon, where there is a pavilion with more facilities, including bar & kitchen – essential for cricket teas.

Burpham Tennis Club was started in 1990 by Jane Hill and benefits from the facilities in the Sutherland Memorial Park extension. They provide coaching, have a junior section and the all-weather courts allow them to play all year round.

Burpham Bowling Club, established 1990, is one of the largest in Guildford. They benefit from a recently refurbished clubhouse, with bar, enabling club members to enjoy a full social programme in addition to matches.

Table Tennis had been played in Burpham since at least 1938, when a team from the Kingpost played in the league. PC Fred Oliver taught youngsters to play at Burpham Youth Club. The Burpham Table Tennis Club started in 1966 and Fred’s children, Derek and Christine won many tournaments. Susan and Linda Howard, Percy’s daughters, played both tennis and table tennis, going on to become top UK players. The club closed in the 80s.

Susan and Linda Howard

During the 1980s the Anchor & Horseshoes had an Aunt Sally team that played in the pub garden and competed in matches with several other local pubs. The pub also had a darts team.

Burpham Aunt Sally team c.1984 (M Oldfield)

Both Burpham Primary School and George Abbot provide a range of sporting activities for pupils and some have gone on to represent their country at their sports.

There was a swimming pool at the Kingpost from the 30s until the 50s, but this was purely a social activity for Burpham. And finally, when the Duke of Sutherland lived at Sutton Place, he kept his polo ponies alongside Clay Lane and Prince Phillip came here to play the game.

If you are willing to share your memories and/or photos to tell us more about Burpham then please contact Moira MacQuaide, either by e-mail (moira.macquaide@gmail.com) or by phone or text (07963 756543). My two books (‘The History of Burpham Primary School’ and ‘Burpham – A Gateway to Guildford’) are still available from me for £10 (free delivery locally) or on Amazon.


Community Update – March & April 2021

To get in touch with the BCA: Contact the secretary on secretary@burphamca.org.uk call 01483 567791 or visit the website at www.burphamca.org.uk

We represent the community of Burpham, Guildford

Covid-19

At the time of writing (end of January), we are still in lockdown with no idea when it will end – just a glimmer of hope that March might bring some relief.

On a positive note, more people are now being vaccinated and those responsible for setting up and running the G Live centre are to be congratulated on a very efficient operation.

The Burpham Community Support Group is still active so if you need help with shopping, collecting prescriptions or would just like to chat to someone don’t hesitate to get in touch. You can call 07880 586455, email support@burphamca.org.uk or contact the Secretary (details below).

Litter picking

Many thanks to the people who have already volunteered to join our group of litter pickers.

Obviously we cannot do very much while strict Covid regulations are still in place but once they are eased, we hope to be out and about keeping our village tidy. If you could spare a couple of hours on a Saturday occasionally, please let Liz Turner know, email membership@burphamca.org.uk All equipment will be provided.

We are also looking to find ways of making the public areas more attractive and any suggestions you may have would be welcome.

What else is the BCA doing in lockdown?

We are still having monthly committee meetings via Zoom. The major event so far was the response to Sainsbury’s application to extend their loading bay – no doubt there will be more to write about on that issue in future updates. And therein we find ourselves in a quandary; quite a few people have challenged the BCA’s actions in the past, saying we are only interested in opposing planning applications. Perhaps now is a good time to take stock and consider this accusation.

Yes, we have opposed some corporate applications where they are likely to cause problems for residents such as increased traffic congestion. No, we do not get involved with individual planning applications; the Burpham Neighbourhood Forum (BNF) might object if some aspect ignores the Neighbourhood Plan, for example insufficient parking spaces.

For newer readers who may not have heard of the BNF, it is a statutory body that worked with the community to produce the Burpham Neighbourhood Plan (BNP). A neighbourhood plan contains planning policies for a single neighbourhood area, in our case Burpham Ward. The BNP was formally adopted by GBC in April 2016 and is used to determine planning applications, along with the Council’s Local Plan.

What the BCA tries to do is perhaps best summed up by that often quoted phrase due diligence. It’s been around since the 16th century, originally meaning care taken to avoid harm to people or property but can also refer to research done before a business transaction. What does this mean for the BCA in practice?

The following article may help to explain.

Weyside Urban Village

This is the proposed Slyfield redevelopment, just across the river from the Nature Reserve. The present sewage treatment plant is to be moved and some 1,500 homes built.

So what does this have to do with Burpham? One committee member decided to find out if we needed to be concerned about anything – 246 documents later, a few things emerged that might be of interest to us.

There’s the sewage problem –
we are at the end of the main sewer from Merrow and Burpham which has flooded three times in four years. Any back flow ends up here so maybe we should investigate further.

“…be familiar with regional and local planning principles, considering how they might best be applied to Burpham and if necessary make representation to appropriate authorities should planning proposals be deemed contrary to good practice or adversely affect local residents.”

The nature reserve will be expanded across to Jacob’s Well which is to be welcomed, but the proposed parking area has only 12 spaces. Will this mean more cars trying to get into Bower’s Lane where there is already a problem, highlighted in the last Burpham Pages?

When the sewage works are relocated, the sludge tower will be moved to land adjacent to the Dennis factory – it will rise some 20 metres. Will this affect the view?

It appears that Thames Water cannot provide sufficient drinking water for all the new houses – will this have any effect on our water supplies?

The BCA Constitution, approved by members in 2018, says we should “be familiar with regional and local planning principles, considering how they might best be applied to Burpham and if necessary make representation to appropriate authorities should planning proposals be deemed contrary to good practice or adversely affect local residents.”

This is what we try to do – not opposition for its own sake but ensuring that the community has a voice in its future development by practising due diligence.


Help by joining the Burpham Community Association today!

Subscriptions are £8 per household or £4 per single occupancy and run from January to December. Join now or renew your membership for 2021.

You can pay by:
Direct Debit – visit our website at www.burphamca.org.uk which has a link to this system – an email to treasurer@burphamca.org.uk giving your details would be helpful.

Online:
Account name: Burpham Community Association.
Sort Code: 40-22-26.
Account Number: 41049194

To help the Treasurer please identify yourself using initials, surname and the first line of your address.

Please contact Liz Turner, our Membership Secretary, if you have any queries. Her email address is membership@burphamca.org.uk


BCA on Facebook & Twitter!
Join the conversation! Open to members and non-members, it’s a great way to stay up-to-date with everything that’s happening in our community.
twitter.com/burpham_c_a
facebook.com/burphamCA/

Guildford Community Lottery
A way for everyone to support local causes and be in with a chance to win prizes of up to £25,000. 50% of all tickets sold from our page go to the BCA!


Community Update – September & October 2021

To get in touch with the BCA: Contact the secretary on secretary@burphamca.org.uk call 01483 567791 or visit the website at www.burphamca.org.uk

We represent the community of Burpham, Guildford

Wey Navigation Lengthsman

Back in the Middle Ages, a lengthsman was someone who kept a length of road tidy and passable. When the canal system was developed, a lengthsman was responsible for a length of canal, maintaining and repairing banks and tow paths, and also undertaking lock keeper’s duties.

The Stoke length of the Wey Navigation runs from Millmead Lock to Bowers Lock, and for the past 16 years has been looked after by Richard Cant who is now moving on to become a lecturer at Merrist Wood.

The BCA is very grateful for all that Richard has done to keep his ‘length’ in good order, and his willingness to help both the BCA and BNF when river issues have cropped up.

He has given an insight into his work in his ‘Richard’s Wey’ column in the Guildford Dragon – well worth a visit to the Dragon if you have never read them. A few years ago, the BCA organised some summer evening walks along the canal and round the Riverside Park; they were led by Richard who gave the walkers a real insight into the canal and wetlands habitat. He also kindly arranged for a boat for those unable to manage the complete walk.

We wish Richard and his family all the very best and thank him for all he has done for ‘our’ bit of the Wey Navigation.

Burpham Flood Forum

The Flood Forum will take place on Friday 24th September, at 1pm in the Village Hall.

Angela Richardson MP will chair the meeting which will include representatives from SCC, GBC, the Environment Agency, Thames Water and the National Trust. The meeting is open to the public, so if you would like to attend please let the Secretary know (contact details above).

At her request, Ms Richardson undertook a walkabout in July to see for herself the various issues raised in the Flood Action Plan – inadequate barriers behind the houses that back on to Merrow Lane, crumbling culverts, cameras that cannot be accessed, foliage maintenance issues and erosion of the watercourses, most evident along the Wey Navigation. The Action Plan is available on our website: www.burphamca.org.uk

Burpham Neighbourhood Forum (BNF) Survey

The first survey was done in 2013, prior to the drawing up of the Burpham Neighbourhood Plan which was formally adopted by GBC in 2016.

Work has started on updating the Neighbourhood Plan and the BNF are conducting a second survey to find out the views and aspirations of all who live and work in Burpham. Ward. You will find a copy inside this magazine, or you can complete it online via the BNF website.

This is your chance to have some say in Burpham’s future – please use it.

A very important date for this year’s diary…

Saturday 11th December, 7.30pm in the Village Hall sees the return of the BCA Christmas Social! There will be a quiz and tombola plus drinks and nibbles and we hope many of you will join us.

…and some more dates for 2022

Sue Hackman and Andrew Plumridge are planning some more Friday evening Winter Lectures. Subjects include talks on marriage and sex in Mediaeval England, gargoyles, a minister on behind the scenes at Westminster, beloved and puzzling objects from the Museum (hands on) and with luck, a Formula One driver.

They hope to present these live in the Village Hall but this will depend on any future restrictions – they will be via Zoom if all else fails. The dates are 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th of January and the 4th February.


Help by joining the Burpham Community Association today!

Subscriptions are £8 per household or £4 per single occupancy and run from January to December. Join now or renew your membership for 2021.

You can pay by:
Direct Debit – visit our website at www.burphamca.org.uk which has a link to this system – an email to treasurer@burphamca.org.uk giving your details would be helpful.

Online:
Account name: Burpham Community Association.
Sort Code: 40-22-26.
Account Number: 41049194

To help the Treasurer please identify yourself using initials, surname and the first line of your address.

Please contact Liz Turner, our Membership Secretary, if you have any queries. Her email address is membership@burphamca.org.uk


BCA on Facebook & Twitter!
Join the conversation! Open to members and non-members, it’s a great way to stay up-to-date with everything that’s happening in our community.
twitter.com/burpham_c_a
facebook.com/burphamCA/

Guildford Community Lottery
A way for everyone to support local causes and be in with a chance to win prizes of up to £25,000. 50% of all tickets sold from our page go to the BCA!


Community Update – July & August 2021

To get in touch with the BCA: Contact the secretary on secretary@burphamca.org.uk call 01483 567791 or visit the website at www.burphamca.org.uk

We represent the community of Burpham, Guildford

Annual
 General
 Meeting

The 
AGM 
took 
place 
via 
Zoom
 on 
May 
13th. 
We 
were 

joined 
by 
Angela 
Richardson 
MP
 who 
engaged
 in 
a
 lively
 and
 
good-humoured
 discussion 
with 
members; 
the 
BCA 
would
 like 

to 
thank 
her 
for
 taking
 the
 time 
to 
talk 
to 
us.

Topics covered included:

  • Gosden Hill Farm developments and the importance of adequate infrastructure.
  • The possibility of an A3 tunnel and its likely impact on carbon emissions.
  • Weyside Urban Village and concerns over sewage capacity and the provision of fresh water. We have subsequently learnt that GBC has been reviewing the needs for new developments and has been told by Thames Water that there is very limited additional drinking water available. The BCA will provide more details when we have had time to study the report carefully and consider the implications.
  • Limited medical facilities available now Burpham has no GP surgery.
  • Proposed country wide changes in planning legislation which could leave local authorities with little control.
  • The importance of listening to local voices.

BCA Committee

The existing committee members were elected for the coming year.

Chair – Andy Clapham

Treasurer – Sue Poole

Membership Secretary – Liz Turner

Technical Advisor – Jim Allen

Minutes Secretary – Catherine Hughes

Secretary – Liz Critchfield (until the end of 2021)

You can read the Annual Report and Financial Report for 2021 on our website. If you would like a copy but don’t have a computer, please phone the secretary on 01483 567791 and we will deliver one.

Litter Picking

Sixteen people walked round most of Burpham on April 10th – the first litter pick of the year. We thought you might like to see what they collected.

Many thanks to the volunteers and to GBC who provided the hi-vis jackets and litter pickers and arranged for the collection of the bags. If you would like to volunteer please contact the Membership Secretary on membership@burphamca.org.uk

Community Heartbeat

You may have read in previous articles that we’re planning to raise funds for two Community Public Access Defibrillators (cPAD) in Burpham. The locations are yet to be fully confirmed but we’re intending one to be fitted outside Sutherland Memorial Hall and one near the shopping parade.

We’ll be working alongside The Community HeartBeat Trust which is a charity whose aims are to help and support communities in the correct provision of defibrillators. So far they have helped over 4500 communities so we’re in safe hands!

Defibrillators (also known as AEDs) are medical devices that help and support a rescue for a patient in cardiac arrest. They achieve this by applying a current of electricity across the heart to stop it, allowing it to reconfigure automatically. Defibrillators are not ‘Heart Re-starters’
– any sign indicating this is wrong!

Death from cardiac arrest if untreated is about 97% of cases. With the correct and rapid treatment, survival to hospital can, in theory, be raised to around the 70% mark, but this assumes rapid action, good CPR (chest compressions) and also the timely use of a defibrillator.

Of course, there’s no point buying and fitting a couple of cPADs and just leaving them. We’ll need to sort out awareness sessions for the community as well as ongoing maintenance to ensure that the units are fully functional at all times.

How much will all this cost?

Including the maintenance for a few years, we’ll be looking to raise in the region of £6,000 for both units. Our fundraising project will kick off soon so please keep an eye on Burpham Pages, our website and newsletters for more information. If you’re keen to help with the fundraising and would like to be involved in this project, please email cpad@burphamca.org.uk.


Help by joining the Burpham Community Association today!

Subscriptions are £8 per household or £4 per single occupancy and run from January to December. Join now or renew your membership for 2021.

You can pay by:
Direct Debit – visit our website at www.burphamca.org.uk which has a link to this system – an email to treasurer@burphamca.org.uk giving your details would be helpful.

Online:
Account name: Burpham Community Association.
Sort Code: 40-22-26.
Account Number: 41049194

To help the Treasurer please identify yourself using initials, surname and the first line of your address.

Please contact Liz Turner, our Membership Secretary, if you have any queries. Her email address is membership@burphamca.org.uk


BCA on Facebook & Twitter!
Join the conversation! Open to members and non-members, it’s a great way to stay up-to-date with everything that’s happening in our community.
twitter.com/burpham_c_a
facebook.com/burphamCA/

Guildford Community Lottery
A way for everyone to support local causes and be in with a chance to win prizes of up to £25,000. 50% of all tickets sold from our page go to the BCA!


Community Update – May & June 2021

To get in touch with the BCA: Contact the secretary on secretary@burphamca.org.uk call 01483 567791 or visit the website at www.burphamca.org.uk

We represent the community of Burpham, Guildford

If at first you don’t succeed…

One of the functions of the Burpham Flood Forum has been to research the various water courses in the Ward.

Upstream from Bowers Lock is possibly the oldest stream; it appears at the rear of Abbotswood and drains into the River Wey. If you walk along the towpath from Bower’s Lane and turn left at the bend by Old Buck’s Weir, heading upstream, you may have noticed a deep ditch on your left which ends in a pipe. This is the outflow from that ancient stream.

The flow of water has been impeded to such an extent that it has flooded the towpath.

Over the years, this ditch has become choked with fallen trees, and other vegetation has been dumped in it. The flow of water has been impeded to such an extent that it has flooded the towpath. The BCA raised this issue with various authorities as far back as 2013 and there followed years of playing that well-known game called ‘pass the responsibility parcel.’

Photograph by Jim Allen

…keep on nagging.

After seven years of patient trawling through a multitude of documents, it transpired that GBC was ‘the responsible landowner’ and therefore responsible for clearing the ditch. We are delighted to report that the fallen tree which was blocking the flow has been removed and we understand that the full length of the watercourse will be cleaned out this spring.

NHS, Social Care and Frontline Workers’ Day

The National Health Service came into being on 5th July 1948 and brought free health care to everyone. In the past year that service has been tested to the limit by the impact of Covid-19.

On Monday July 5th this year we have an opportunity to show our gratitude when the first NHS, Social Care and Frontline Workers’ Day. takes place. It is hoped to hold a series of events throughout the day – flag raising, a 2 minute silence at 11am, special lunches and teas and at 8pm church bells will ring out.

The BCA hopes to do something to mark this occasion…

Money will be raised for two causes – NHS Charities Together and the National Care Association. The BCA hopes to do something to mark this occasion, perhaps working with other Burpham groups so keep a look out on social media for more information. To find out more about this event go to https://www.nhsfrontlineday.org

Litter picking

The first BCA litter pick of the year was due to take place on the 10th April (this article was written at the end of March).

Many thanks to all the volunteers. If you would like to join in, please contact the Membership Secretary on membership@burphamca.org.uk

The average household in the UK throws away around one tonne of rubbish every year; of that, 400kg is plastic waste.

The average household in the UK throws away around one tonne of rubbish every year; of that, 400kg is plastic waste. The Covid pandemic has seen a huge increase in single use plastic – cleaning wipes, disposable masks and gloves, and coffee cups, not to mention 38.5 million plastic bottles every day. Much of this ends up in landfill, or incinerators or in the environment. There are a few simple things we can do to help prevent this:

  • Use a refillable water bottle.
  • Take your own re-useable cup for coffee. Many businesses in Guildford accept them and some offer a discount for using them rather than disposable ones.
  • Avoid single use packaging – buy loose if you can.
  • Try refill shopping – there are several places in Guildford where you can refill dry foods and bathroom essentials – Noel’s Farm Shop in Sutton Green, Guild Foods Market in Woodbridge Road and Food for Thought in North Street.

For more information contact Plastic Free Guildford at www.plasticfreeguildford.org.uk or their Facebook page www.facebook.com/PlasticFreeGLD


Help by joining the Burpham Community Association today!

Subscriptions are £8 per household or £4 per single occupancy and run from January to December. Join now or renew your membership for 2021.

You can pay by:
Direct Debit – visit our website at www.burphamca.org.uk which has a link to this system – an email to treasurer@burphamca.org.uk giving your details would be helpful.

Online:
Account name: Burpham Community Association.
Sort Code: 40-22-26.
Account Number: 41049194

To help the Treasurer please identify yourself using initials, surname and the first line of your address.

Please contact Liz Turner, our Membership Secretary, if you have any queries. Her email address is membership@burphamca.org.uk


BCA on Facebook & Twitter!
Join the conversation! Open to members and non-members, it’s a great way to stay up-to-date with everything that’s happening in our community.
twitter.com/burpham_c_a
facebook.com/burphamCA/

Guildford Community Lottery
A way for everyone to support local causes and be in with a chance to win prizes of up to £25,000. 50% of all tickets sold from our page go to the BCA!


The Anchor and Horseshoes Pub

Moira MacQuaide’s history of Burpham

Now the only pub in Burpham, despite the growth of the community over the last century, the Anchor and Horseshoes has a long history. The name of the pub has varied over the years, but always included either Anchor or Horseshoes or both. But how old is it?

A map from 1675 seems to show two pubs on the London Road in Burpham, in approximately the right places to be the Anchor & Horseshoes and the Green Man, so could the pub be one of the two oldest buildings in the village?

The earliest paper records show that George Heath was the Licensed Victualler, or publican, in 1785, followed by his son James until 1826. The family ran two business – the pub and the village blacksmith. From the 1830s William Baker ran the pub, with his wife Lois, who was James Heath’s daughter. After William’s death she went on to run the business with her second husband, James Alllwright, but after his death she continued as publican on her own for another 35 years. She was the last of her family to own the pub after more than 100 years and was buried at St Luke’s Church in 1889. “…having accommodation for travellers and persons requiring refreshment other than drink; stabling provided; for the use of the general public.” Lois’s son William inherited the pub, but wasn’t interested in running it, so he leased the business to the Guildford brewers Lascelles Tickner. Later it was sold to Farnham United Breweries, who were taken over by Courage & Co in 1927. In 1892 the pub was described as

“…having accommodation for travellers and persons requiring refreshment other than drink; stabling provided; for the use of the general public.”

In 1904 it had four bedrooms and stabling for four horses. Managers came and went but the Lintott family ran the pub for almost 30 years in the mid 20th century. A road traffic improvement scheme in the 1930s proposed putting a new road through the pub garden, which would have left the building marooned on an island between two roads. In 1954 a small plane crashed into the garden, when Kenneth Owen’s Gemini aircraft’s wing hit a row of trees and was almost sliced in two. The pub became a useful meeting place for finding tradesmen of various sorts, and it was often the starting point for stag nights for young people.

Over the years it has been extended and renovated several times. However, if you look at the side of the building, from the main car park, you can see the timber frame building in the external walls, suggesting that the original pub was built earlier than 1700.

If you are willing to share your memories and/or photos to tell us more about Burpham then please contact Moira MacQuaide, either by e-mail (moira.macquaide@gmail.com) or by phone or text (07963 756543). My two books (‘The History of Burpham Primary School’ and ‘Burpham – A Gateway to Guildford’) are still available from me for £10 (free delivery locally) or on Amazon.


Jonathan Dudley – Publican of Burpham

Moira MacQuaide’s history of Burpham

“Jonathan Dudley, long time publican of the Green Man in Burpham, is one of my local history conundrums!”

Jonathan was born in Leighton Buzzard in 1846. In his youth he was an agricultural labourer on farms in Bedfordshire, then worked as a coachman. In 1869 he married Martha Tarrier in Luton and they had eight children, though five died in infancy, the last three being born in Worplesdon. It’s not clear why they moved to Surrey, or how John (as he became known) came to Burpham, but by 1876 he was working in Worplesdon as a coachman.

It’s likely that they didn’t live in Burpham as they had three of their children baptized at St Mary’s, Worplesdon in 1876, but the rest were baptized at St Luke’s. By 1878 he was recorded as being the Publican for the Green Man and was living there with his family and lodgers. The pub was owned by the Elkins family until 1890, when it was sold to Hodgsons Kingston Breweries.

Martha died in 1884, aged 37 years, leaving John working at the pub and looking after four small children. She was buried in St Luke’s graveyard. In the late 19th century, Burpham was still a small hamlet, with around 350 residents, one church and two pubs. John would have been an important man in the community, knowing most people as the Green Man would have been a popular meeting place. In 1888, having lived here for about ten years, John married Maud Ellen Durrant Mansell of Chiddingfold. They had four children, of which their only son, Frederick, served in the Great War.

John would have been an important man in the community, knowing most people as the Green Man would have been a popular meeting place.

John continued as publican at the Green Man into the early 20th century, but from 1909 to 1912 he was replaced by Alfred Jacob. For some reason he became a builder’s contractor and was living with his wife and four children in George Road in Guildford. (Why the change?) However, by 1913 John was back running the pub, which he continued to do until about 1922.

From about 1920 they lived at Cornflower Cottages in Burpham, no longer residing at the pub. John died in 1927 and Maud Ellen moved to Woking until her death in 1936. She was buried with John at St Luke’s.

John and Maud Ellen's headstone in St. Luke's graveyard.

Many of John’s children stayed in the Burpham and Woking area and it may be that some of their families are still living here – I would love to find out. John Junior, and wife Emily, lived on Burpham Lane for many years and his
two daughters attended the local school.

But the questions remain – why did Jonathan Dudley come to Surrey and why, in his sixties, did he change jobs but then return to the pub for another ten years? If you know then please do tell me!

If you are willing to share your memories and/or photos to tell us more about Burpham then please contact Moira MacQuaide, either by e-mail (moira.macquaide@gmail.com) or by phone or text (07963 756543). My two books (‘The History of Burpham Primary School’ and ‘Burpham – A Gateway to Guildford’) are still available from me for £10 (free delivery locally) or on Amazon.